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Table 1 Rapid qualitative detection of different edible adulterants in milk

From: Common milk adulteration and their detection techniques

Adulterant Procedure Observation Limit of detection (v/v) (R. Sharma, Rajput, Barui, & N., 2012) References
Sugar Take 5 mL milk sample in a test tube. Add 1 mL conc. HCl and 0.1 g resorcinol solution. Place the test tube in water bath for 5 min. Appearance of red color indicates he presence of added sugar. 0.2% (w/v) (Sharma et al. 2012); (Kamthania et al. 2014); (Arvind Singh et al. 2012)
Starch Take 3 mL sample in a test tube. After boiling it thoroughly, cool it to room temperature. Add 1 drop of 1% iodine solution. Appearance of blue color indicates he presence of starch. 0.02% (w/v) (Sharma et al. 2012); (Arvind Singh et al. 2012), (Kumar et al. 1998)
Glucose Take 1 ml of milk sample in a test tube. Add 1 ml of modified Barfoed's reagent. Heat the mixture for exact 3 min in a boiling water bath. Rapidly cool under tap water. Immediate appearance of deep blue color indicates the presence of glucose. 0.1% (w/v) (Sharma et al. 2011)
Add one ml of phosphomolybdic acid reagent to the turbid solution.
Common salt Take 5 ml of milk sample into a test tube. Add 1 ml of 0.1 N silver nitrate solution. Mix the content thoroughly and add 0.5 ml of 10% potassium chromate solution. Appearance of yellow color indicates the presence of added salts, whereas, brick red color indicates the milk free from added salt. 0.02% (w/v) (Sharma et al. 2012)
Buffalo milk Dilute the milk 1/10. Put a drop of diluted milk on the centre of a glass slide. Now place a drops of Hansa test serum (duly preserved) on the drop of milk and mix together with a glass rod or clean tooth pick. Curdy particles develop within half a minute in milk containing buffalo milk.   (Kamthania et al. 2014); (Arvind Singh et al. 2012)